SANDY BEACH

The high tide line (strandline) is where the sea drops seaweed which provides nutrients for the upper beach. Sandhoppers and kelp flies break down the weed and other detritus. In the surf, bass come close inshore to feed on kelp fly larvae. The pied wagtail and rock pipit eat the kelp fly larvae, kelp flies and beetles. Rooks also pick over the weed along with voles, hedgehogs and foxes. Pioneer species such as sea rocket, orache, sea sandwort and sea sedge grass grow in the highest line of tide, once the seaweed has broken down. Marram grass grows further up which traps sand with long roots which build the dunes. Sea spurge, mustard, sea bindweed and sea beet also grow in the dunes. Solitary wasps live in the hardened sand dunes. Shrews, stoats, lizards, slow worms and adders live here. The kestrel and the sparrow hawk wait to catch what they can. On the beach sea birds such as the oystercatcher and the black headed gull, kitty wakes and herring gull and back backs come to rest up and drink from the stream. Grey seals and their pups also come ashore in the autumn. Sometimes sea creatures and sea birds wash ashore when they’ve died and need to be recorded.
Sandy Beach Food chain:

Grey seal
|
Bass
|
Kelp fly larvae
|
Seaweed

Adder
|
Lizard
|
Snail
|
Sea beet

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